Accessing private websocket data from tradingview in python

When working with websockets in Python, it is sometimes necessary to access private data from external sources. In this article, we will explore different ways to access private websocket data from TradingView in Python.

Option 1: Using the websocket library

The first option is to use the websocket library in Python. This library provides a simple and straightforward way to establish a websocket connection and send/receive data. Here is an example of how to access private websocket data from TradingView using this library:


import websocket

def on_message(ws, message):
    # Handle received message
    print(message)

def on_error(ws, error):
    # Handle error
    print(error)

def on_close(ws):
    # Handle connection close
    print("Connection closed")

def on_open(ws):
    # Send authentication message
    ws.send("AUTHENTICATE")

# Establish websocket connection
websocket.enableTrace(True)
ws = websocket.WebSocketApp("wss://tradingview.com/ws",
                            on_message=on_message,
                            on_error=on_error,
                            on_close=on_close)
ws.on_open = on_open
ws.run_forever()

This code sets up the necessary event handlers for handling received messages, errors, and connection close. It also sends an authentication message to TradingView upon connection open. You can customize the code to handle the received data according to your requirements.

Option 2: Using the asyncio library

If you prefer an asynchronous approach, you can use the asyncio library in Python. This library provides a way to write concurrent code using coroutines, multiplexing I/O access over sockets and other resources. Here is an example of how to access private websocket data from TradingView using asyncio:


import asyncio
import websockets

async def connect():
    # Establish websocket connection
    async with websockets.connect("wss://tradingview.com/ws") as ws:
        # Send authentication message
        await ws.send("AUTHENTICATE")

        # Receive and handle messages
        async for message in ws:
            print(message)

# Run the event loop
asyncio.get_event_loop().run_until_complete(connect())

This code uses the websockets library, which is built on top of asyncio, to establish a websocket connection and send/receive data. It uses the async/await syntax to define asynchronous functions and run the event loop.

Option 3: Using the requests library

If you prefer a synchronous approach, you can use the requests library in Python. This library provides a simple and intuitive way to send HTTP requests and handle responses. Here is an example of how to access private websocket data from TradingView using requests:


import requests

# Send authentication request
response = requests.post("https://tradingview.com/authenticate",
                         data={"token": "YOUR_TOKEN"})

# Check response status code
if response.status_code == 200:
    # Access private websocket data
    websocket_data = requests.get("https://tradingview.com/ws",
                                  headers={"Authorization": "Bearer " + response.json()["access_token"]})
    print(websocket_data.json())
else:
    print("Authentication failed")

This code sends an authentication request to TradingView using the requests library. If the authentication is successful (status code 200), it then accesses the private websocket data using the obtained access token. You can modify the code to handle the received data according to your needs.

Among the three options, the best choice depends on your specific requirements and preferences. If you prefer a simple and straightforward approach, option 1 using the websocket library is a good choice. If you prefer an asynchronous approach, option 2 using the asyncio library is recommended. If you prefer a synchronous approach and are comfortable with sending HTTP requests, option 3 using the requests library is a viable option.

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9 Responses

    1. I personally find Option 1 more practical for beginners. It might require some extra effort, but its worth it in the long run. Option 3 might seem easier, but it can limit your growth and understanding of Python trading. Stick with the challenge! #PythonTrading

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