Blender python script place connect vertices by global co ordinance

Blender is a powerful 3D modeling software that allows users to create and manipulate objects in a virtual environment. One common task in Blender is connecting vertices by their global coordinates using a Python script. In this article, we will explore three different ways to achieve this goal.

Option 1: Using bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add()

The bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add() function in Blender’s Python API allows us to create new edges and faces between selected vertices. We can use this function to connect vertices by their global coordinates.


import bpy

# Select the vertices you want to connect
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.select_all(action='DESELECT')
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

# Get the global coordinates of the selected vertices
selected_vertices = [v.co for v in bpy.context.object.data.vertices if v.select]

# Connect the vertices by their global coordinates
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.select_all(action='DESELECT')
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

for v in bpy.context.object.data.vertices:
    if v.co in selected_vertices:
        v.select = True

bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add()
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

This code first selects the vertices you want to connect, then retrieves their global coordinates. It then goes back to edit mode, selects the vertices by their global coordinates, and finally uses bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add() to connect them.

Option 2: Using bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add()

Another way to connect vertices by their global coordinates is by using the bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add() function. This function allows us to create new edges between selected vertices.


import bpy

# Select the vertices you want to connect
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.select_all(action='DESELECT')
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

# Get the global coordinates of the selected vertices
selected_vertices = [v.co for v in bpy.context.object.data.vertices if v.select]

# Connect the vertices by their global coordinates
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.select_all(action='DESELECT')
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

for v in bpy.context.object.data.vertices:
    if v.co in selected_vertices:
        v.select = True

bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add()
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

This code follows a similar approach as the previous option, but instead of using bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add(), it uses bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add() to create the edges between the selected vertices.

Option 3: Using bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops()

The bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops() function is another option to connect vertices by their global coordinates. This function creates a bridge between two edge loops, which can be used to connect vertices.


import bpy

# Select the vertices you want to connect
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.select_all(action='DESELECT')
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

# Get the global coordinates of the selected vertices
selected_vertices = [v.co for v in bpy.context.object.data.vertices if v.select]

# Connect the vertices by their global coordinates
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.select_all(action='DESELECT')
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

for v in bpy.context.object.data.vertices:
    if v.co in selected_vertices:
        v.select = True

bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='EDIT')
bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops()
bpy.ops.object.mode_set(mode='OBJECT')

This code follows a similar approach as the previous options, but instead of using bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add() or bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add(), it uses bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops() to create the bridge between the selected vertices.

After exploring these three options, it is clear that the best approach depends on the specific requirements of your project. If you need to create new faces between the connected vertices, bpy.ops.mesh.edge_face_add() might be the most suitable option. If you only need to create edges between the vertices, bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add() could be a better choice. Finally, if you want to create a bridge between two edge loops, bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops() is the way to go.

Consider the specific needs of your project and choose the option that best fits your requirements.

Rate this post

12 Responses

    1. I couldnt disagree more. Option 2 is a disaster waiting to happen. Its unreliable and outdated. You should definitely reconsider your choice. #BlenderPythonScripting

  1. Option 2: Using bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add()? Nah, I prefer the thrill of Option 1! #BlenderScriptingFun

    1. Option 2 may lack the thrill, but its all about efficiency and getting the job done. No time for unnecessary excitement when you can achieve the same result with bpy.ops.mesh.primitive_edge_add(). Lets focus on productivity, shall we? #BlenderScriptingSimplicity

  2. Option 3: Using bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops()? More like option bridge to frustration. Blender, why so complicated?

    1. I understand that using bpy.ops.mesh.bridge_edge_loops() can be frustrating at first, but its important to remember that mastering any software requires practice and patience. Blender offers a range of powerful features, so dont let a single option discourage you. Keep exploring and youll find the right tools for your needs.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Table of Contents