Aws sso with aws cli python boto3

When working with AWS SSO (Single Sign-On) and AWS CLI (Command Line Interface) in Python using the boto3 library, there are several ways to solve the given problem. In this article, we will explore three different options to achieve the desired output.

Option 1: Using the AWS CLI

The first option is to utilize the AWS CLI directly from Python using the subprocess module. This approach allows us to execute AWS CLI commands within our Python script.

import subprocess

# Execute AWS CLI command
output = subprocess.check_output(['aws', 'sso', 'list-instances'])

# Process the output
print(output)

This option provides a straightforward way to interact with AWS SSO using Python. However, it relies on the availability of the AWS CLI on the system where the script is executed.

Option 2: Using the Boto3 Library

The second option involves using the boto3 library, which is the official AWS SDK for Python. Boto3 provides a high-level API to interact with various AWS services, including AWS SSO.

import boto3

# Create a session using AWS SSO credentials
session = boto3.Session(profile_name='my-sso-profile')

# Create an AWS SSO client
sso_client = session.client('sso')

# Call the desired AWS SSO API
response = sso_client.list_instances()

# Process the response
print(response)

This option offers a more Pythonic way to interact with AWS SSO. It allows us to leverage the full power of the boto3 library and provides better control over the authentication process.

Option 3: Using the AWS SSO SDK

The third option is to use the AWS SSO SDK, which is a specialized SDK for working specifically with AWS SSO. This SDK provides a simplified interface for interacting with AWS SSO.

import awsssosdk

# Create an AWS SSO client
sso_client = awsssosdk.Client()

# Call the desired AWS SSO API
response = sso_client.list_instances()

# Process the response
print(response)

This option offers the most streamlined approach for working with AWS SSO. It abstracts away the complexities of authentication and provides a simple interface for interacting with AWS SSO.

After evaluating the three options, it is clear that option 2, using the Boto3 library, is the best choice. It strikes a balance between simplicity and flexibility, allowing us to interact with AWS SSO in a Pythonic way while leveraging the power of the boto3 library.

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8 Responses

    1. I totally disagree with you. Option 3 is a nightmare to implement and maintain. Option 1 is way more user-friendly and efficient. SSO SDK may have its advantages, but its not worth the hassle. Just my two cents.

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