Access printer connected at virtual printer port usb001 using python escpos on

The task at hand is to access a printer connected at virtual printer port usb001 using Python escpos. There are multiple ways to achieve this, and in this article, we will explore three different solutions.

Solution 1: Using the escpos library

The escpos library is a Python library that provides a simple interface for controlling ESC/POS compatible thermal printers. To use this library, we need to install it first. Open your terminal and run the following command:

pip install python-escpos

Once the library is installed, we can use it to access the printer connected at virtual printer port usb001. Here’s a sample code that demonstrates how to do it:

from escpos.printer import Usb

# Connect to the printer
printer = Usb(0x0416, 0x5011)

# Print a test message
printer.text("Hello, Printer!")
printer.cut()  # Cut the paper

# Close the connection
printer.close()

This code connects to the printer using the USB vendor and product IDs (0x0416 and 0x5011, respectively). It then prints a test message and cuts the paper. Finally, it closes the connection to the printer.

Solution 2: Using the win32print library

If you are using Windows, you can also access the printer using the win32print library. This library provides a set of functions for interacting with printers on Windows systems. To use this library, we need to install the pywin32 package. Open your terminal and run the following command:

pip install pywin32

Once the package is installed, we can use the win32print library to access the printer connected at virtual printer port usb001. Here’s a sample code that demonstrates how to do it:

import win32print

# Get the printer name
printer_name = win32print.GetDefaultPrinter()

# Open the printer
printer_handle = win32print.OpenPrinter(printer_name)

# Start a print job
job_info = win32print.StartDocPrinter(printer_handle, 1, ("Test", None, "RAW"))

# Send the data to the printer
win32print.WritePrinter(printer_handle, b"Hello, Printer!")

# End the print job
win32print.EndDocPrinter(printer_handle)

# Close the printer
win32print.ClosePrinter(printer_handle)

This code gets the default printer name, opens the printer, starts a print job, sends the data to the printer, ends the print job, and finally closes the printer.

Solution 3: Using the subprocess module

Another way to access the printer connected at virtual printer port usb001 is by using the subprocess module to execute a command-line print command. This solution is platform-independent and does not require any additional libraries. Here’s a sample code that demonstrates how to do it:

import subprocess

# Define the print command
print_command = f"echo Hello, Printer! > LPT1"

# Execute the print command
subprocess.run(print_command, shell=True)

This code defines a print command that echoes the message “Hello, Printer!” to the LPT1 port, which is typically associated with the virtual printer port usb001. It then uses the subprocess module to execute the print command.

After exploring these three solutions, it is clear that Solution 1, using the escpos library, is the best option. It provides a dedicated library for controlling ESC/POS compatible thermal printers, making it easier to work with the printer and perform various operations. Additionally, the escpos library offers more flexibility and functionality compared to the other two solutions.

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5 Responses

  1. Im honestly blown away by how many different solutions there are for printing via Python. Who knew it could get so complicated? 🤷‍♂️

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