Turning display with tkinter gui on and off on raspberry pi using python3

When working with a Raspberry Pi and Python, it is common to use the tkinter library to create graphical user interfaces (GUIs). One common task is to turn the display on and off programmatically. In this article, we will explore three different ways to achieve this using Python 3.

Option 1: Using the subprocess module

The subprocess module allows us to run shell commands from within our Python script. We can use this module to execute the appropriate shell command to turn the display on or off. Here is an example:

import subprocess

def turn_display_on():
    subprocess.run(["vcgencmd", "display_power", "1"])

def turn_display_off():
    subprocess.run(["vcgencmd", "display_power", "0"])

# Example usage
turn_display_on()

This code uses the subprocess.run() function to execute the vcgencmd display_power command with the appropriate arguments to turn the display on or off. This method is simple and straightforward, but it relies on executing shell commands, which may not be ideal in all situations.

Option 2: Using the RPi.GPIO library

If you prefer a more Pythonic approach, you can use the RPi.GPIO library to control the display. This library provides a Python interface to the GPIO pins on the Raspberry Pi. Here is an example:

import RPi.GPIO as GPIO

DISPLAY_PIN = 17

def turn_display_on():
    GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BCM)
    GPIO.setup(DISPLAY_PIN, GPIO.OUT)
    GPIO.output(DISPLAY_PIN, GPIO.HIGH)

def turn_display_off():
    GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BCM)
    GPIO.setup(DISPLAY_PIN, GPIO.OUT)
    GPIO.output(DISPLAY_PIN, GPIO.LOW)

# Example usage
turn_display_on()

This code uses the RPi.GPIO library to set up the GPIO pin connected to the display and control its state. This method is more Pythonic and does not rely on executing shell commands. However, it requires additional setup and may not be suitable for all projects.

Option 3: Using the tkinter library

If you are already using the tkinter library for your GUI, you can directly control the display using the wm_attributes method of the tkinter window. Here is an example:

import tkinter as tk

root = tk.Tk()

def turn_display_on():
    root.attributes("-fullscreen", True)

def turn_display_off():
    root.attributes("-fullscreen", False)

# Example usage
turn_display_on()

This code creates a tkinter window and uses the attributes method to set the -fullscreen attribute to True or False to turn the display on or off. This method is the most integrated with tkinter and does not require any additional libraries or setup. However, it may not be suitable if you are not already using tkinter for your GUI.

After exploring these three options, it is clear that the best choice depends on the specific requirements of your project. If you are already using tkinter for your GUI, option 3 provides the most seamless integration. If you prefer a more Pythonic approach, option 2 using the RPi.GPIO library is a good choice. Finally, if simplicity is your priority, option 1 using the subprocess module is the easiest to implement.

Rate this post

13 Responses

    1. Option 2 might be fun for tech nerds like you, but not everyone enjoys messing around with GPIO. Some of us prefer a simpler and more user-friendly experience. Different strokes for different folks, my friend. #JustSaying

    1. I personally think option 2 is the way to go. It offers something different and could be quite exciting. But hey, to each their own. We all have our preferences, right? Let’s just respect that and keep the discussion friendly.

    1. Option 3 with tkinter might be user-friendly, but it lacks the flexibility and functionality of Option 1. Don’t be fooled by the shiny interface, go for the practicality.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Table of Contents