Building a python script to create a tree of directory structure of sharepoint d

When working with SharePoint, it can be useful to have a script that creates a tree-like directory structure of the SharePoint site. This can help in organizing and managing the files and folders within SharePoint. In this article, we will explore three different ways to achieve this using Python.

Option 1: Using the os module

The os module in Python provides a way to interact with the operating system. We can use this module to create directories and subdirectories in the SharePoint site. Here is a sample code that demonstrates this approach:

import os

def create_directory_structure(path):
    if not os.path.exists(path):
        os.makedirs(path)
        print("Directory structure created successfully.")
    else:
        print("Directory structure already exists.")

# Usage
path = "SharePoint/Site/Directory"
create_directory_structure(path)

This code uses the os.makedirs() function to create the directory structure. It first checks if the directory already exists using os.path.exists(). If the directory does not exist, it creates the entire directory structure using os.makedirs(). Otherwise, it prints a message indicating that the directory structure already exists.

Option 2: Using the SharePoint REST API

SharePoint provides a REST API that allows us to interact with SharePoint sites programmatically. We can use this API to create directories and subdirectories in the SharePoint site. Here is a sample code that demonstrates this approach:

import requests

def create_directory_structure(site_url, path):
    headers = {
        "Accept": "application/json;odata=verbose",
        "Content-Type": "application/json;odata=verbose"
    }

    url = f"{site_url}/_api/web/folders"
    folders = path.split("/")
    for folder in folders:
        payload = {
            "__metadata": {"type": "SP.Folder"},
            "ServerRelativeUrl": folder
        }
        response = requests.post(url, headers=headers, json=payload)
        if response.status_code == 201:
            print(f"Directory '{folder}' created successfully.")
        elif response.status_code == 409:
            print(f"Directory '{folder}' already exists.")
        else:
            print(f"Failed to create directory '{folder}'. Error: {response.text}")

# Usage
site_url = "https://sharepoint-site-url"
path = "Site/Directory"
create_directory_structure(site_url, path)

This code uses the requests library to send HTTP requests to the SharePoint REST API. It iterates over each folder in the path and sends a POST request to create the folder using the SharePoint REST API. The response status code is checked to determine if the folder was created successfully or if it already exists.

Option 3: Using the SharePoint Online Client Object Model

If you are working with SharePoint Online, you can use the SharePoint Online Client Object Model to interact with SharePoint sites. This approach requires the installation of the SharePointPnPCoreOnline package. Here is a sample code that demonstrates this approach:

from shareplum import Site

def create_directory_structure(site_url, path):
    authcookie = Site(site_url).authcookie
    site = Site(site_url, authcookie=authcookie)
    folders = path.split("/")
    for i, folder in enumerate(folders):
        folder_url = "/".join(folders[:i+1])
        site.create_folder(folder_url)
        print(f"Directory '{folder}' created successfully.")

# Usage
site_url = "https://sharepoint-site-url"
path = "Site/Directory"
create_directory_structure(site_url, path)

This code uses the shareplum library to interact with SharePoint Online. It creates a connection to the SharePoint site using the site URL and authentication cookie. It then iterates over each folder in the path and creates the folder using the create_folder() method provided by the library.

After exploring these three options, it is clear that the best option depends on the specific requirements and constraints of the project. If you are working with SharePoint on-premises or have limitations on installing additional packages, Option 1 using the os module is a good choice. If you are working with SharePoint Online and have the flexibility to install packages, Option 3 using the SharePoint Online Client Object Model provides a more streamlined approach. Option 2 using the SharePoint REST API is a versatile option that can be used in both on-premises and online scenarios.

Ultimately, the choice of the best option depends on factors such as the SharePoint environment, project requirements, and available resources. It is recommended to evaluate these options and choose the one that best fits your specific needs.

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11 Responses

  1. Option 3 seems like the most efficient way to create a directory tree. What do you think, guys? #SharePoint #Python

    1. I totally agree! Option 3 is the way to go. It combines the power of SharePoint with the flexibility of Python. A winning combination! #EfficiencyRules #TechGenius

  2. Wow, Option 3 sounds like a real game-changer! So much potential for customization and automation. #SharePointHacks

    1. I couldnt agree more! REST API is the real MVP! Its efficient, flexible, and just works like a charm. No need for fancy alternatives when you have this powerhouse. Lets keep riding the Python and REST API wave to success! 🚀🐍

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