Broken pipe error python while trying to netcat large file into termbin com

When trying to netcat a large file into termbin.com, you may encounter a “Broken pipe” error in Python. This error occurs when the connection between the netcat command and termbin.com is interrupted, usually due to the large file size. Fortunately, there are several ways to solve this issue.

Solution 1: Increase the buffer size

One way to solve the “Broken pipe” error is to increase the buffer size. By default, the buffer size is set to a lower value, which may not be sufficient for large files. You can increase the buffer size by modifying the netcat command in your Python code.


import subprocess

file_path = "path/to/large/file"
command = f"cat {file_path} | nc termbin.com 9999 -q 1 -w 5 -b 8192"

try:
    output = subprocess.check_output(command, shell=True)
    print(output.decode())
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e:
    print(f"Error: {e}")

In the above code, we have increased the buffer size to 8192 bytes by adding the “-b 8192” option to the netcat command. This should help prevent the “Broken pipe” error when dealing with large files.

Solution 2: Use a file transfer protocol

Another solution is to use a file transfer protocol instead of netcat. This can be achieved by using the “ftplib” module in Python. By using FTP, you can transfer the large file to termbin.com without encountering the “Broken pipe” error.


from ftplib import FTP

file_path = "path/to/large/file"

try:
    ftp = FTP("termbin.com")
    ftp.login()
    with open(file_path, "rb") as file:
        ftp.storbinary(f"STOR {file_path}", file)
    ftp.quit()
    print("File uploaded successfully!")
except Exception as e:
    print(f"Error: {e}")

In the above code, we establish an FTP connection with termbin.com and upload the large file using the “storbinary” method. This method ensures that the file is transferred without encountering the “Broken pipe” error.

Solution 3: Split the file into smaller chunks

If the above solutions do not work or are not feasible for your use case, you can consider splitting the large file into smaller chunks and sending them individually. This can be done using the “split” command in Python.


import subprocess

file_path = "path/to/large/file"
chunk_size = 1024 * 1024  # 1MB

try:
    subprocess.check_output(f"split -b {chunk_size} {file_path} {file_path}.part", shell=True)
    for part in glob.glob(f"{file_path}.part*"):
        command = f"cat {part} | nc termbin.com 9999 -q 1 -w 5"
        output = subprocess.check_output(command, shell=True)
        print(output.decode())
        subprocess.check_output(f"rm {part}", shell=True)
except subprocess.CalledProcessError as e:
    print(f"Error: {e}")

In the above code, we split the large file into smaller chunks using the “split” command and then send each chunk individually using the netcat command. This approach helps avoid the “Broken pipe” error by sending smaller chunks instead of the entire file at once.

After considering these three solutions, the best option depends on your specific requirements and constraints. If increasing the buffer size resolves the issue, it is the simplest and most straightforward solution. However, if you need to transfer the file using a different protocol or splitting the file into smaller chunks is more suitable for your use case, then Solution 2 or Solution 3 may be the better choice.

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3 Responses

  1. Personally, Id go for Solution 2, because who doesnt love some good old file transfer protocol action? 📡💻

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