Access gets blocked outerror 403 right after login using python requests

When using the Python requests library to make HTTP requests, it is not uncommon to encounter errors such as a 403 Forbidden status code. This error typically occurs when the server understands the request, but refuses to authorize it. In this article, we will explore three different ways to handle this error and provide a solution to access a blocked resource after logging in using Python requests.

Option 1: Handling the 403 Error

import requests

url = "https://example.com/login"
data = {
    "username": "your_username",
    "password": "your_password"
}

session = requests.Session()
response = session.post(url, data=data)

if response.status_code == 200:
    # Successfully logged in, continue with the desired action
    # For example, accessing a blocked resource
    blocked_resource_url = "https://example.com/blocked_resource"
    blocked_resource_response = session.get(blocked_resource_url)
    print(blocked_resource_response.text)
else:
    print("Failed to log in. Status code:", response.status_code)

In this option, we first make a POST request to the login URL with the provided username and password. If the response status code is 200, it means that the login was successful. We then proceed to make a GET request to the blocked resource URL using the same session object. This allows us to maintain the session and any necessary cookies for subsequent requests. Finally, we print the response text of the blocked resource.

Option 2: Modifying Headers

import requests

url = "https://example.com/blocked_resource"
headers = {
    "User-Agent": "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/58.0.3029.110 Safari/537.3"
}

response = requests.get(url, headers=headers)

if response.status_code == 200:
    print(response.text)
else:
    print("Failed to access the blocked resource. Status code:", response.status_code)

In this option, we directly make a GET request to the blocked resource URL. However, we modify the headers of the request to mimic a legitimate user agent. Some websites block requests from certain user agents, so by using a commonly used user agent, we increase the chances of successfully accessing the blocked resource. If the response status code is 200, we print the response text; otherwise, we print an error message.

Option 3: Using Proxies

import requests

url = "https://example.com/blocked_resource"
proxies = {
    "http": "http://your_proxy_ip:your_proxy_port",
    "https": "https://your_proxy_ip:your_proxy_port"
}

response = requests.get(url, proxies=proxies)

if response.status_code == 200:
    print(response.text)
else:
    print("Failed to access the blocked resource. Status code:", response.status_code)

In this option, we make a GET request to the blocked resource URL using a proxy. Proxies act as intermediaries between the client and the server, allowing us to bypass certain restrictions imposed by the server. We specify the proxy IP address and port in the proxies dictionary. If the response status code is 200, we print the response text; otherwise, we print an error message.

After considering the three options, the best solution depends on the specific scenario and the nature of the blocking mechanism. Option 1 is suitable when the website requires authentication before accessing the blocked resource. Option 2 is useful when the blocking is based on user agents. Option 3 is effective when the blocking is IP-based or when using a proxy is allowed. It is recommended to analyze the situation and choose the most appropriate option accordingly.

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4 Responses

    1. Im in! Modifying headers is like a secret weapon against that pesky 403 error. Its all about outsmarting the system, my friend. Lets unleash our inner ninjas and conquer those restrictions!

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