1006 connection closed abnormally error with python 3 7 websockets

When working with Python, it is common to encounter errors that can be challenging to solve. One such error is the “1006 connection closed abnormally” error when using Python 3.7 websockets. This error occurs when the connection between the client and server is unexpectedly closed.

Option 1: Handling the error with try-except

One way to solve this error is by using a try-except block to handle the exception. This allows us to catch the error and perform any necessary actions to handle it gracefully.


import websockets

async def connect():
    try:
        # Code to establish connection
        await websockets.connect('ws://example.com')
    except websockets.exceptions.ConnectionClosedError as e:
        # Code to handle the error
        print(f"Connection closed abnormally: {e}")

In this example, we use the websockets.connect() function to establish a connection. If the connection is closed abnormally, the ConnectionClosedError exception is raised. We catch this exception using the except block and handle it accordingly.

Option 2: Using a decorator to handle the error

Another approach is to use a decorator to handle the error. This allows us to separate the error handling logic from the main code, making it more modular and reusable.


import websockets

def handle_connection_closed_error(func):
    async def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
        try:
            return await func(*args, **kwargs)
        except websockets.exceptions.ConnectionClosedError as e:
            # Code to handle the error
            print(f"Connection closed abnormally: {e}")
    return wrapper

@handle_connection_closed_error
async def connect():
    # Code to establish connection
    await websockets.connect('ws://example.com')

In this example, we define a decorator function handle_connection_closed_error() that wraps the original connect() function. The decorator catches the ConnectionClosedError exception and handles it accordingly. This allows us to reuse the decorator with other functions that may encounter the same error.

Option 3: Using an event loop to handle the error

Alternatively, we can use an event loop to handle the error. This approach is useful when working with multiple connections or when we want to handle the error asynchronously.


import asyncio
import websockets

async def connect():
    while True:
        try:
            # Code to establish connection
            await websockets.connect('ws://example.com')
        except websockets.exceptions.ConnectionClosedError as e:
            # Code to handle the error
            print(f"Connection closed abnormally: {e}")
            # Code to retry the connection
            await asyncio.sleep(5)

In this example, we use a while loop to continuously attempt to establish a connection. If the connection is closed abnormally, the error is handled, and the code waits for a specified amount of time before retrying the connection.

After considering these three options, the best approach depends on the specific requirements of your project. If you only need to handle the error in a single function, using a try-except block (Option 1) is a simple and straightforward solution. However, if you want to separate the error handling logic or reuse it with multiple functions, using a decorator (Option 2) is a more modular approach. Finally, if you are working with multiple connections or need to handle the error asynchronously, using an event loop (Option 3) is the most suitable option.

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