Asynchronous requests with python requests

When working with Python requests, you may come across situations where you need to make asynchronous requests. Asynchronous requests allow you to send multiple requests simultaneously, improving the overall performance of your code. In this article, we will explore three different ways to achieve asynchronous requests with Python requests.

Option 1: Using the ‘asyncio’ Library

The first option is to use the ‘asyncio’ library, which provides a way to write asynchronous code using coroutines, tasks, and event loops. To make asynchronous requests with Python requests using ‘asyncio’, you need to install the ‘aiohttp’ library, which is an asynchronous HTTP client built on top of ‘asyncio’.

import asyncio
import aiohttp

async def make_request(url):
    async with aiohttp.ClientSession() as session:
        async with session.get(url) as response:
            return await response.text()

async def main():
    urls = ['https://example.com', 'https://google.com', 'https://github.com']
    tasks = [make_request(url) for url in urls]
    responses = await asyncio.gather(*tasks)
    print(responses)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    asyncio.run(main())

This code snippet demonstrates how to make asynchronous requests using ‘asyncio’ and ‘aiohttp’. The ‘make_request’ function is an asynchronous function that sends a GET request to the specified URL and returns the response text. The ‘main’ function creates a list of tasks, each representing a request, and uses ‘asyncio.gather’ to wait for all the tasks to complete. Finally, the responses are printed.

Option 2: Using the ‘httpx’ Library

The second option is to use the ‘httpx’ library, which is a modern, user-friendly HTTP client for Python. ‘httpx’ supports both synchronous and asynchronous requests, making it a great choice for making asynchronous requests with Python requests.

import httpx

async def make_request(url):
    async with httpx.AsyncClient() as client:
        response = await client.get(url)
        return response.text

async def main():
    urls = ['https://example.com', 'https://google.com', 'https://github.com']
    tasks = [make_request(url) for url in urls]
    responses = await asyncio.gather(*tasks)
    print(responses)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    asyncio.run(main())

This code snippet demonstrates how to make asynchronous requests using the ‘httpx’ library. The ‘make_request’ function is an asynchronous function that sends a GET request to the specified URL and returns the response text. The ‘main’ function creates a list of tasks, each representing a request, and uses ‘asyncio.gather’ to wait for all the tasks to complete. Finally, the responses are printed.

Option 3: Using the ‘grequests’ Library

The third option is to use the ‘grequests’ library, which is a Python library that allows you to send asynchronous HTTP requests using ‘requests’ under the hood. ‘grequests’ provides a simple and intuitive interface for making asynchronous requests with Python requests.

import grequests

def make_request(url):
    response = grequests.get(url)
    return response.text

def main():
    urls = ['https://example.com', 'https://google.com', 'https://github.com']
    requests = [grequests.get(url) for url in urls]
    responses = grequests.map(requests)
    print([response.text for response in responses])

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

This code snippet demonstrates how to make asynchronous requests using the ‘grequests’ library. The ‘make_request’ function sends a GET request to the specified URL and returns the response text. The ‘main’ function creates a list of requests, each representing a request, and uses ‘grequests.map’ to send the requests asynchronously. Finally, the response texts are printed.

After exploring these three options, it is clear that using the ‘httpx’ library is the better choice for making asynchronous requests with Python requests. ‘httpx’ provides a modern and user-friendly interface, supports both synchronous and asynchronous requests, and offers additional features such as HTTP/2 support and automatic connection pooling. It is a powerful library that simplifies the process of making asynchronous requests and improves the performance of your code.

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3 Responses

  1. Option 3 with grequests sounds like a fun and quirky choice! Who doesnt love a bit of randomness in their life? 🤪

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