Asynchronous python with eel

Asynchronous programming is becoming increasingly popular in Python due to its ability to handle multiple tasks concurrently. One popular library for creating graphical user interfaces (GUIs) in Python is Eel. Eel allows you to create web-based GUIs using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, while still leveraging the power of Python in the backend. In this article, we will explore different ways to use asynchronous Python with Eel to create responsive and efficient applications.

Option 1: Using asyncio

The first option is to use the built-in asyncio library in Python. asyncio provides a way to write asynchronous code using coroutines, tasks, and event loops. To use asyncio with Eel, we need to create an event loop and run it in a separate thread. Here’s an example:


import asyncio
import eel

async def my_async_function():
    # Perform asynchronous tasks here

@eel.expose
def my_sync_function():
    # Perform synchronous tasks here

def start_eel():
    loop = asyncio.new_event_loop()
    asyncio.set_event_loop(loop)
    loop.run_until_complete(eel.start('index.html', size=(800, 600)))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    eel.init('web')
    eel.spawn(start_eel)
    eel.start('main.html', size=(800, 600))

In this example, we define an asynchronous function my_async_function() and a synchronous function my_sync_function(). We then create an event loop using asyncio.new_event_loop() and run it using loop.run_until_complete(). Finally, we initialize Eel using eel.init(), spawn the event loop in a separate thread using eel.spawn(), and start the Eel application using eel.start().

Option 2: Using Trio

Another option for asynchronous programming in Python is the Trio library. Trio is designed to be a simpler and more intuitive alternative to asyncio. To use Trio with Eel, we need to create a nursery and run it in a separate thread. Here’s an example:


import trio
import eel

async def my_async_function():
    # Perform asynchronous tasks here

@eel.expose
def my_sync_function():
    # Perform synchronous tasks here

async def start_eel():
    async with trio.open_nursery() as nursery:
        nursery.start_soon(eel.start, 'index.html', size=(800, 600))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    eel.init('web')
    trio.run(start_eel)

In this example, we define an asynchronous function my_async_function() and a synchronous function my_sync_function(). We then create a nursery using trio.open_nursery() and start the Eel application using nursery.start_soon(). Finally, we initialize Eel using eel.init() and run the Trio application using trio.run().

Option 3: Using Quart

Quart is a web microframework based on Quart, which is a Python asynchronous web framework. It provides an easy-to-use interface for creating web applications with asynchronous capabilities. To use Quart with Eel, we need to create a Quart application and run it in a separate thread. Here’s an example:


from quart import Quart
import eel

async def my_async_function():
    # Perform asynchronous tasks here

@eel.expose
def my_sync_function():
    # Perform synchronous tasks here

app = Quart(__name__)

@app.route('/')
async def index():
    return await eel.js('index.html', size=(800, 600))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    eel.init('web')
    app.run()

In this example, we define an asynchronous function my_async_function() and a synchronous function my_sync_function(). We then create a Quart application using Quart(__name__) and define a route for the index page using @app.route(). Finally, we initialize Eel using eel.init() and run the Quart application using app.run().

After exploring these three options, it is clear that using asyncio is the most straightforward and widely supported way to use asynchronous Python with Eel. It provides a familiar syntax and is well-documented, making it easier for developers to understand and maintain the code. However, Trio and Quart offer alternative approaches for those who prefer a simpler or more web-focused solution. Ultimately, the choice depends on the specific requirements and preferences of the project.

Rate this post

10 Responses

    1. Trio? Seriously? Why complicate things with a fancy library when good old standard Python is more than sufficient? Stick to the basics, buddy. No need for unnecessary spices. 🌶️

  1. Option 3: Using Quart seems like the perfect choice for a seamless asynchronous Python experience. Agree or disagree?

    1. Disagree. Quart may seem appealing, but its not the only option for a seamless async Python experience. There are alternative frameworks like FastAPI and Tornado that offer similar features. It all comes down to personal preference and project requirements.

    1. Interesting choice! While Trio may make your code dance, I find Option 1: Using asyncio to be more reliable and widely supported. Its all about finding what works best for your project. Happy coding!

  2. Option 1: Using asyncio? Meh, sounds like a snooze-fest. Cant we spice it up with something more exciting? 🌶️🤔

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